A new kind of Smartwatch

We set out to build a Smartwatch that is not crammed with every sensor available, instead we’ve engineered Gameband around the key features we believe are really important: A kick-ass processor, a stunning display, outstanding connectivity, a big battery and a great OS.
We also added a MicroSD port to give access to massive amounts of data, right on your wrist; and finally, because there's more to life than just raw power ;) we brought it to life with retro gaming design and content.

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Screen

1.6” Square AMOLED 320 x 320
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Processor

Qualcomm Snapdragon Wear 2100
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Memory

512MB RAM, 4GB ROM (EMMC)
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Fear OS

Based on Android Nougat 7.1

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Sensors

3-axis Accelerometer, Gyro Sensor, Light Sensor
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Connectivity

Wifi 802.11 b/g/n Dual Band, Bluetooth 4.2
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Battery

400mAh
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Ports

Micro SD Slot + USB Type-C
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Plug & Play

Our software & unique IC switch mean that when plugged into a computer the MicroSD runs our PixelFurnace game management and launch platform at USB3.0 speeds, and when connected via Bluetooth data can be accessed via mobile or audio devices.

Want to know more?

One of the fastest, most powerful, Smartwatches ever made.
 

Gameband is based on the Qualcomm Snapdragon Wear 2100 processor, arguably one of the fastest and most capable wearable processors in the market today.

Rather than over-stack Gameband with every conceivable component available, we focused on picking only the core components we believe are essential to a great Smartwatch experience.

Gameband is compatible with iOS and Android, and comes with essential companion apps for both that let you manage every aspect of Gameband functionality.

We had specific requirements for our design. It needed to be robust, as durable as a watch, while incorporating gaming influences and giving us the flexibility to create special editions, and all without over-complicating the manufacturing process. Drawing inspiration from rugged weaponry, vehicles and tools seen in games, the goal was to bring about a real-world device that you could just as easily imagine inside a game.

The result was a two-piece frame, held in place with 4 bolt screws, delivering both a design objective, and a functionality objective, all in one.